Just in time for Halloween!

If you’re looking for something creepy to listen to around your October campfire, try my newest audiobooks.

The first is “The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge,” narrated by the fabulous J. Rodney Turner. Here’s a bone-chilling sample:

And don’t miss Old Man Stuckey and yours truly on the Travel Channel’s “Most Terrifying Places in America” the whole month of October.

The next is my newest book “Witch Dance,” narrated by Sarah L. Colton. Her voice is pretty sweet, but the story? Not so much. Watch out for the evil witches!

Sleep well, my friends. 🙂

The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge
Witch Dance

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Lori Crane books are available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, and Audible

Lori Crane is a bestselling author of historical fiction and the occasional thriller. Her books have climbed to the Kindle Top 100 lists many times, including “Elly Hays” which debuted at #1 in Native American stories. She has also enjoyed a place among her peers in the Top 100 historical fiction authors on Amazon, climbing to #23. She resides in greater Nashville and is a professional musician by night – an indie author by day.

Look for Lori on “Most Terrifying Places in America” on the Travel Channel the whole month of October, where her book “The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge” will be featured! Coming episodes will air:

Sunday Oct 21 2pm ET | 1pm CT
Thursday Oct 25 12pm ET | 11am CT
Monday Oct 29 5pm ET | 4pm CT

WITCH DANCE is here!!!

Today is release day and I couldn’t be more excited! Drama, karma, and yes, witches are coming your way.

witch dance coverJust south of Tupelo, Mississippi on the Natchez Trace lies a place of mystery called Witch Dance.

When Thomas and Margaret Speedwell took their twins to Witch Dance for a weekend camping trip, they never imagined they would be pulled into a vortex of witchcraft, tragedy, and karma. One of the girls goes missing; the other won’t say what happened on the other side of the hill.

The tragedy pulls together a cast of characters from Margaret’s childhood and beyond – Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, Toltec ancestors, the extinct Hopewell tribe.

With the help of a childhood friend, a concerned newspaper reporter, and visions by a strange old woman, a two-thousand-year-old mystery begins to unfold, uncovering missing children throughout generations. Who is taking them? Could it be the infamous witches of Witch Dance?

Click here for Kindle.

Click here to check out a snippet.

Click here to see photos of the cast if I were to cast the movie. 🙂

How Do You Get Your Child Back From An Evil Witch?

witch dance cover

 

Release day for WITCH DANCE is right around the corner, September 15th to be exact. It’s pretty easy to figure out the tale centers around witches, and the blurb indicates the story is about missing children, so the bottom line is: How Do You Get Your Child Back From An Evil Witch? Let’s ask our heroine, Margaret Speedwell.

Lori: Thanks for joining us today, Margaret!

Margaret: It’s my pleasure to be here.

L: I don’t even know where to start, so why don’t you just tell us what happened.

M: Sure. My husband, Thomas, and I took a weekend trip down to Tupelo with our twins. We stayed at a campground called Witch Dance on the Natchez Trace Parkway, and we visited an old burial site called the Bynum Mounds. Our daughters ran over the mounds and Emily came back alone. Sarah disappeared.

L: That must have been terrifying! Tell me you found her.

M: Yes, it certainly was terrifying, and yes, we did find her.

L: Thank goodness! So, where was she?

M: I don’t want to give away too much of the story, but I guess I can share with you that she was kidnapped.

L: Kidnapped?

M: Yes. Kidnapped by witches.

L: I don’t want to make light of your story, but witches seem a little far-fetched.

M: Before rescuing her, I would have said the same thing, but I saw them, I fought them.

L: I assume, since you got your daughter back, you won.

M: *smile*

L: How did you win? What did they look like? Where did they come from? I’m sorry, those are a lot of questions, but I’ve never heard a story like this before.

M: And you never will again. When it was all said and done, we stopped them.

L: We, who?

M: There were a couple wonderful women who helped me get Sarah back. Miss Myrtle Brooks, sort of an eccentric old dame, and Grandma Ivy, who I knew growing up. Those elderly ladies are the bravest and strongest people I know.

L: So, you say you stopped the witches? Does that mean you killed them? And how would one kill wicked witches?

M: Well, I can tell you they were not all wicked, and they are not all dead. The good ones are still with us.

L: This sounds like an amazing story! I guess we’ll have to read it.

M: I’m sure the author would appreciate it if you did.

L: One last question. How’s Sarah?

M: This morning when I left to come here, she was sitting in front of SpongeBob SquarePants munching on a bowl of Cocoa Krispies, so I think she’ll be fine.

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Witch Dance at Amazon –  click here!

Lori Crane is a bestselling and award-winning author of historical fiction and the occasional thriller. Her books have climbed to the Kindle Top 100 lists many times, including “Elly Hays” which debuted at #1 in Native American stories. She has also enjoyed a place among her peers in the Top 100 historical fiction authors on Amazon, climbing to #23. She resides in greater Nashville and is a professional musician by night – an indie author by day.

Lori’s books are available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

 

 

Witch Dance – Let’s Go Camping!

My new book is inspired by a campground on the Natchez Trace Parkway, just south of Tupelo, Mississippi, called Witch Dance. At the entrance stands a sign which reads:

The very name conjures visions of eerie midnights, swirling black capes and brooms stacked against a nearby tree. The old folks say the witches gathered here to dance and wherever their feet touched the ground the grass withered and died never to grow again. Impossible? Maybe so, but look around. Look for a hidden spot where no grass grows.

The sign and the place bring to mind one of my favorite authors, poet Jack Prelutsky. One of his poems, The Witch, inspires wild imaginations of scary witches. 

She comes by night, in fearsome flight,
In garments black as pitch,
the queen of doom upon her broom,
the wild and wicked witch

Another tale of Witch Dance that I find interesting is the story of a group of Chickasaw Indians who lived on the spot and were massacred by the hostile Creek Indians. Legend has it the Great Spirit turned the soil the color of blood, cursing it for all time. That is why the ground is red in Mississippi.

If you’ve ever read any of my books, you know I always look for the connection between the place, the truth, and the legend.

The result of the above is my book Witch Dance. Here’s the blurb:

Just south of Tupelo, Mississippi on the Natchez Trace lies a place of mystery called Witch Dance.

When Thomas and Margaret Speedwell took their twins to Witch Dance for a weekend camping trip, they never imagined they would be pulled into a vortex of witchcraft, tragedy, and karma. One of the girls goes missing; the other won’t say what happened on the other side of the hill.

The tragedy pulls together a cast of characters from Margaret’s childhood and beyond – Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, Toltec ancestors, the extinct Hopewell tribe.

With the help of a childhood friend, a concerned newspaper reporter, and visions by a strange old woman, a two-thousand-year-old mystery begins to unfold, uncovering missing children throughout generations. Who is taking them? Could it be the infamous witches of Witch Dance?

Grab a copy at Amazon.

I didn’t mean for it to happen, but sometimes synchronicity takes over. I believe instances of synchronicity are the way you know you’re on the right path. They happen frequently in my life.

The opening chapter of Witch Dance starts August 25, 2018, which is a little easter egg for my family, as August 25th was my mom’s birthday. The story takes place over three weeks (and 2000 years) and ends Sept 15 – Release Day!

Coincidence?

witch dance cover

 

WITCH DANCE IS HERE!

witch dance cover

pre order

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WITCH DANCE is now available for pre-order at Amazon.

 

If you’d like a sneak peek of the opening chapter of WITCH DANCE, click here.

Please forward this to your friends and family, and watch for my coming television special about Stuckey’s Bridge this October on “America’s Most Terrifying Places” on the Travel Channel!

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Witch Dance Pre-release

I’m so excited about my new book, Witch Dance! It’s in the final stages of editing and will be available for pre-orders very soon. I’ll post the link here as soon as it goes live. The official release date is September 15th and will be available in ebook and paperback at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Smashwords, Create Space, Kobo, Sony, iBooks, and other online retailers. There will also be a blog tour and a Facebook release party, so stay tuned.

 

witch dance coverWitch Dance

Just south of Tupelo, Mississippi on the Natchez Trace lies a place of mystery called Witch Dance.

When Thomas and Margaret Speedwell took their twins to Witch Dance for a weekend camping trip, they never imagined they would be pulled into a vortex of witchcraft, tragedy, and karma. One of the girls goes missing; the other won’t say what happened on the other side of the hill.

The tragedy pulls together a cast of characters from Margaret’s childhood and beyond – Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, Toltec ancestors, the extinct Hopewell tribe.

With the help of a childhood friend, a concerned newspaper reporter, and visions by a strange old woman, a two thousand year old mystery begins to unfold, uncovering missing children throughout generations. Who is taking them? Could it be the infamous witches of Witch Dance?

 

Backstory of “Stuckey’s Bridge”

Here’s a little background on my series – The Stuckey’s Bridge Trilogy.

stuckey's bridge from VA Iron and Bridge Co on wikiMy childhood: I grew up in Meridian, Mississippi and heard the legend of Stuckey’s Bridge my whole life. It actually began in a book about the area written in the 1970s. The local paper, The Meridian Star, picked up on the legend from the book and the story spread like wildfire. The bridge instantly became THE place to party on the weekends, searching for ghosts and frightening girls into cuddling closer. (If you want to go there: head south out of Meridian on Interstate 59. Turn right at exit 142, then a quick left onto Meehan-Savoy Road. Travel 2.2 miles until you see a dirt road on your left. That is Stucky Bridge Road. The bridge will be about two miles down the dirt road. It is now closed, so you’ll have to turn around to leave. After you read the following legend, you may not want to go.)

The legend goes: In the late 1800s, a former member of the Dalton Gang came to Lauderdale County, Mississippi to find his fortune. He opened an inn near the Chunky River and stood on the old wooden bridge at night, flagging down merchants with his lantern, offering them a warm bed and a hot meal. Supposedly, he murdered his victims in their sleep and buried their bodies on the banks of the river. In 1901, the Virginia Bridge and Iron Company began rebuilding the old bridge and the bodies were discovered. The innkeeper, Old Man Stuckey as he is known to the locals, was hung by a posse from the iron rails of the new bridge.

Stuckey's cover_webIf you know me, you know I couldn’t stop searching until I figured out who this Old Man Stuckey really was…that became the first book in the Stuckey’s Bridge Trilogy – The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge. (Check out the book trailer here…creepy!)

unnamedWhile writing the story, I didn’t want Old Man Stuckey to be alone all the time, so I had him run across a young boy named Levi. In the story, young Levi took on a creepiness all his own, and I received tons of emails and messages asking what Levi’s past was. As usual with my overactive imagination, I was more interested in his future than his past, so I wrote Stuckey’s Legacy: The Legend Continues. At the end of that book, Levi “got his” and the story became focused on the young woman Levi met during the story – Penelope Juzan.

Back to my childhood: There was a second legend around the area where I grew up. Supposedly there was an inn on Lake Juzan in the 1840s where an innkeeper murdered his guests for wealth, much like Old Man Stuckey. The man’s name was Pierre Juzan, and he dumped the bodies in the lake with the help of his Indian sidekick. Toward the end of the legend, one of them killed the other for the wealth of gold they had confiscated.

Side note: There were also a couple different accounts of trunks of confederate gold disappearing as they traveled through the area during the Civil War.

I thought all these stories had a similar thread, and I wondered if I could separate them or maybe combine them.

stuckey Gold Cover smallBack to the trilogy: I came to the conclusion that these legends were indeed different stories, but thought they were probably connected in some way. Those crazy ideas in my head became the third book in the trilogy, Stuckey’s Gold: The Curse of Lake Juzan.

These tales tickled me pink while writing them, and I hope you enjoy them too!

stuckey Trilogy_ smal